Scott-Patrick Mitchell



birak

from over the scarp, fire wind barks: hot is the lot given to us who live in Perth. UV so white it’s like invasion all over again. climate change an explanation that pollies deny, a vain blame game, but proof …

Posted in 84: SUBURBIA | Tagged

kambarang

the trend is warming split seasons into six from white noise & thought, ungrip. static hiss as heat waves out back from middle of the track. the degrees will rise & climb swooping is occasion : monochromatic arcs dive & …

Posted in 82: LAND | Tagged

OBSOLETE Editorial

Tracy Ryan in Western Australia ‘Obsolete’ can only be neutral or pejorative; it is never a compliment. Even those who value the old, the superseded object or mode, are reinstating it so as to deny that the object or mode …

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but we still dig

God, we don’t like to complain – We know that the mine is no lark – But – there’s the pools from the rain: But – there’s the cold and the dark. from Caliban in the Coal Mines by Louis …

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Michael Farrell Reviews ‘Fremantle Poets 1: New Poets’

Fremantle Poets 1: New PoetsFremantle Poets 1: New Poets (Fremantle Arts Centre Press, 2010)

There is an apt awkwardness and uncertainty in all three poets – Emma Rooksby, Scott-Patrick Mitchell, J.P. Quinton – here: in the expression of sentiment (‘Preparations’, Rooksby), in the use of syntax (Mitchell) and archaisms like ‘verily’ (Quinton). All three are skilled poets, but they are new, and there is a sense that they are still trying things out. As editor Tracy Ryan writes, the three are ‘extremely diverse in tone and approach’ and this diversity is pronounced in a way that would be tempered were there more poets in the book. Ryan’s selected poets represent three modes, rather than merely variety itself. This is not a sampler, however, but three books in one, and perhaps not designed to be read sequentially.

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[from] love is a muscle (an e.p.

…; if you are work, be the work of play; if you are play, be the play of morphine on consciousness; if you are dancing, then, sure, dance, dance, but let the music be loud, the lights bright, the company …

Posted in 36: ELECTRONICA | Tagged

Kim Young-Moo and Perth

As somebody who was born elsewhere, I can identify with Kim Young-Moo’s Perth poetry. His awe for the Swan River corresponds with an awe that has bloomed through my own poetic tropes. It’s an awe I have seen flourish in the poetry of other West Australian poets, those who I admire or aspire toward. Perhaps it’s the innate love of rivers, a shared ancestral respect for these points where we build our cities.

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