J.P. Quinton



Concrete: A Shikoku Pilgrimage

A long day of road walking out of Tokushima. Twenty-five, twenty-six kilometres including five hundred metres of gravel before and after Temple 18. Rosie and I left the hotel at about 7:15am and walked along one of the main arterial roads. It was like walking from Perth to Armadale along Albany Highway during peak hour.

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OBSOLETE Editorial

Tracy Ryan in Western Australia ‘Obsolete’ can only be neutral or pejorative; it is never a compliment. Even those who value the old, the superseded object or mode, are reinstating it so as to deny that the object or mode …

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Seven Years, to the Day

His cursive writing. His presence. This old green logbook to help find lost bushwalkers Makes him seem right behind that ghost gum. Blood that took half a decade to purify. This man, my father who lay in this hut. In …

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Michael Farrell Reviews ‘Fremantle Poets 1: New Poets’

Fremantle Poets 1: New PoetsFremantle Poets 1: New Poets (Fremantle Arts Centre Press, 2010)

There is an apt awkwardness and uncertainty in all three poets – Emma Rooksby, Scott-Patrick Mitchell, J.P. Quinton – here: in the expression of sentiment (‘Preparations’, Rooksby), in the use of syntax (Mitchell) and archaisms like ‘verily’ (Quinton). All three are skilled poets, but they are new, and there is a sense that they are still trying things out. As editor Tracy Ryan writes, the three are ‘extremely diverse in tone and approach’ and this diversity is pronounced in a way that would be tempered were there more poets in the book. Ryan’s selected poets represent three modes, rather than merely variety itself. This is not a sampler, however, but three books in one, and perhaps not designed to be read sequentially.

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