ESSAYS

Erasure Poetry As Outsourcing the Lexicon with Reference to Srikanth Reddy’s Voyager and M NourbeSe Philip’s Zong!

Certainly one of the most radical works of erasure poetry is Zong! (Wesleyan, 2008) by M NourbeSe Philip. Where many other examples choose an ample text to move through in linear fashion, producing enough material in the process to constitute the project in its entirety, Philip instead reacts to an extreme paucity of information.

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Fair Trade: a way to RE/order /imagine /code the world

It was August 2017 and the location was The Tibetan Kitchen on Brunswick Street in Meanjin, Brisbane.

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Just Mediation: Videogames, Reading and Learning

The inclination, first, and then the capability, of schooled literacy in its institutional framing – most prominently the study of literature – to integrate videogames into its terms of reference has been of interest to us for over a decade.

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The Stakes of Settlement: Fences in Ned Kelly and Michael Farrell

Signalling possession, privatisation, and productivity, the fence was one of the main props by which a cadastral grid (comprised of adjoining rectangular land parcels) was imposed on the Australian landscape.

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Arts of the Possible: Time, Politics and Gaming’s Virtual Worlds

The relation of digital games to narrative and storytelling has been the subject of considerable back-and-forth among academics, who sometimes seek to draw hard lines between putatively linear media such as novels, film or TV, and the multilinear structures of digital games.

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Instapoetry: The Anxiety of the Influencer

On Instagram, old questions about sincerity and identity in the lyric voice meet new pressures from the digital attention economy. This collision has produced evolutions in form, but also prompted critical questions about the Instapoem’s commodification of selfhood and about …

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Simulative Pleasure: The Game of Reading in English Education

A state of bliss requires an openness to uncertainty. And why not learn all this with love?

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GAME Editorial

As we write this, we are living in cities that are both in lockdown. Our days see us bouncing from one device to another, room to room to room.

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Exoskeletonism: Writing Poetry about the Films of Akira Kurosawa

These lines are from a second poem of mine about the image of the actor Toshiro Mifune in the Akira Kurosawa film Rashomon (1950), a follow-up to my poem ‘The Bandit Without Mifune’, which refers to an autonomous image of the bandit character waking in the oil of the celluloid – a much better line than those above, I know.

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Weaving Blankets of Story and Hearts of Gold: An Archival-poetics Praxis

My dad was diagnosed with lung cancer on his fifty-ninth birthday and after a fierce battle with his body and mind, he died two years later. In the face of all odds, he maintained optimism and hope.

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NO THEME 10 Editorial

A callout for a poetry of consciousness ‘that enacts and is responsible for what it considers’, that has been written with an awareness of ‘crises, brinks and redress’, was always going to bring some powerful and confronting work.

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BROWNFACE editorial

I was 12 and in Year 7 when Chris Lilley’s mockumentary Summer Heights High aired on ABC for the first time.

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A Mouth Saying Stroh-beh-ree

For reasons sufficient to the writer, as ‘Papa’ would say, certain places, people and words have been left out of these notes. Some are secret and some are known by everyone.

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In Black and White: Pictures from the Camera Obscura

I’ve been trying to train myself out of black. It’s not going well – on the rack my eye still heads that way every time. I know in theory that some colour would suit me better but I seem to be shut in the dark.

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SINGAPORE Editorial

We consciously eschewed the substantial but well-represented body of Singaporean poetry originally written in English, and instead sought out voices from Tamil, Malay, Chinese and more which have not been as well circulated in the anglophone literary world.

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PROPAGANDA Editorial

Loaded term: propaganda. Hardly the mild descriptive tag of its origin, the word now invokes visions of cynical manipulation, grand conspiracies to turn entire populations against their own interests and against each other. Sure, plenty of coordination between bad actors …

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Excerpt from In the Time of the Manaroans

Miro Bilbrough’s memoir, In the time of the Manaroans, is set in a remote countercultural milieu in Aotearoa in the late seventies.

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The Surveyed Vision: 36 Meditations on 3 Books by Barry Hill (Peacemongers, Grass Hut Work and Reason & Lovelessness)

a. Justice is Barry Hill’s overarching leitmotiv.

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Music Becomes Memory: What Listening to Music Does to the Poetic Voice

When I think about the music that’s closest to me, that’s an inextricable part of my identity in how unwaveringly I have carried it through time.

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Fox Mask Children

Exactly one year ago, foxes appeared in the forests and towns around here for the first time. In muscular structures, trauma or damage to the fibres is the very condition of growth.

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CREATURELY: In Praise of New Poetry from Aotearoa

We are living in uncanny, uncertain, and uneven times. It is difficult not to feel undone by it all.

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A Poet’s Progress in the ABC: Reflections on a Life in Radio

On my job application to the ABC in 1983 I mentioned that I was a poet, even though the job advertised was for a purely technical position as a trainee sound engineer.

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Anti-Doodles: a Dada-ist Game for Long Pandemic Afternoons

As 20th Century Europe erupted into the chaos of the Great War, Dadaists responded with art forms that reflected the fragmentation and the unintelligibility of the world around them.

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On Speaking and Unheard Women: Interrogating Classical Silence in the Poetry of Anna Jackson and Helen Rickerby

When we meet Cassandra in Aeschylus’s ‘Agamemnon’ – this stolen princess, this famed beauty turned ill-starred prophet, hauled onstage as Agamemnon’s prize for victory over the Trojans – she is silent for 270 lines.

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