Julia Kristeva



Vorticist Portraiture in Mina Loy’s Anglo-Mongrels and the Rose

Mina Loy’s book-length poem Anglo-Mongrels and the Rose (1923-25) essentially presents an alternative, revised understanding of the modernist figure of the artist through a ‘polyglot’ language and avant-garde form (Perloff, English as a Second Language, online.). I argue in this essay that each of the characters within the poem is constructed through a Vorticist model, which also encompasses elements of Futurist and Cubist theory, as well as structurally incorporating Steinian poetics.

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Horse

eaten away with a black hole now. He said that there were migranes caused just by the way the head is held now. When we were children. His father hurt me. Freud hurts me because he tells me and then he forgets me. He tells me and then he forgets me.I tell me and then I forget me. But I remember me here.It is the mouth And the digestive system. The Alimentary canal the network of my body .

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John Kendall Hawkins Reviews Poetic Revolutionaries: Intertextuality and Subversion

Poetic Revolutionaries: Intertextuality and SubversionAs I read Marion May Campbell’s new book, Poetic Revolutionaries: Intertextuality and Subversion, I was reminded of the still seemingly sacred notion of a democratic historical progress. This notion celebrates cultural alterity (and all that that implies), and makes an urgent appeal to textual revolution as a means to political resistance. Campbell’s work is rooted in the relativist revolution – the book is part of publisher Rodopi’s Postmodern Series – and her intense, erudite study addresses a state of disunion that has loosely bound the dwindling body of progressives ever since.

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