GUNCOTTON



A Personal Letter from the People’s Republic of Cork to the People of Cordite

Cork is Ireland’s second city with a population just shy of 120,000 people. It has a river, a university, an art collage, a cathedral, some art galleries, community centres, shops, multi-national chains, pubs, cafes, restaurants; all the things you would …

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Integral to the Ethos of The Other Room

At the beginning of 2008 Alex Davies, co-organiser with Steve Willey of the London poetry reading series Openned, convened a meeting of a group of loosely-associated poets with a commitment to experimental and innovative writing in Manchester. The poets were …

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Submission to Cordite 51: TRANSTASMAN Open!

Photo by Nicholas Walton-Healey Poetry for Cordite 51: TRANSTASMAN is guest-edited by Bonny Cassidy I’ll be looking for poems that can swim, fly, float, sail and possibly even skim across the very short and very deep difference between Australia and …

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Rolfe on with Object Study

Photo by Ian ten Seldam Only heads and tongues loll. Apart from one’s time, what can be bided? And how broad is a swathe? Cordite Poetry Review is excited to work with the next generation of Aden Rolfe poetics over …

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O’Keefe on as Audio Producer

Cordite is chuffed to announce that Ella O’Keefe will be our inaugural Audio Producer, and lends a stack of audio production knowledge to the journal. We’re already beavering away on detail for our first 20-30 minute program.

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Lost Venues, Long Nights: An Introduction to Historical Maps of Live Music in Sydney and Melbourne

Advertisements for Phoenician Club (closed 1998) and Phantom Records store (also closed 1998), On The Street, Sydney, August 1991 As with many other industries, live music in Australia has undergone a form of restructuring. Much of this occurred during the …

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I.M. Tomaž Šalamun (4 July 1941- 27 December 2014)

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Submission to The Lifted Brow and Cordite’s 51.1: UMAMI Now Open!

Luke Davies, Paris, 2014, photo by Samuel Pignan. Poetry for The Lifted Brow / Cordite 51.1: UMAMI is guest-edited by Luke Davies. Submission of flash fiction (between 1 and 500 words max) and poetry will be accepted until 11.59pm, 5 …

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Instructions As Art: Digital Writers as Modern-day Renaissance People

I am now almost thirty years old. While there were many different gaming consoles around when I was a kid, I wasn’t privy to many of them. I was a fairly active child and teenager who spent most of her spare time outdoors (usually wandering around parks aimlessly). My education did not involve classroom computers, however I did have access to one at home.

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How Poems Work: Kate Fagan’s ‘Through a Glass Lightly: Cento for Beginners

We move through language, swimming on influence, arranging words into patterns that make sense for our purposes. An essay with an argument, an email trying to get the day off work, or a poem that tries to make letters do …

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Kevin Matthews Connects with Spoken Word Poet Tanya Evanson

Image from The Great Black North Tanya Evanson is as generous of spirit as she is on stage in the hour we spent on Skype from a sunny, mosquito-netted room in Antigua, following an email correspondence. She has the knack …

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How Poems Work: Nora Gould’s ‘While he waited for the school bus’

‘While he waited for the school bus’ is just one example of the extraordinary work that defines Nora Gould’s new book. Steadfastly observant, carefully detailed and with the capacity to twin trauma and beauty, Gould’s debut collection represents some of …

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