GUNCOTTON



(after) HER: dating app adventures

how do you say how you doin?? without evoking Joey from Friends? ♥ I’m only here because I want to find a girl to ask wanna Netflix and chill? ♥ I filter out the over 40 silver-haired broken embrace that …

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The Future of Music

1. Is it the sound of rain, or rain Distorted, a downpipe, the pitch Of blue harmonics in a score of blue? There, the sound, and then there’s you, Grand arbiter, the governor of loops, By whits, you pulse, you …

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His Master’s Voice

for my father Shovel i. Beneath a trademark rust – spendnought the worn calligraphy of work – still stamped on the shaft. The work ethic of his generation. Not replaced but repaired, over and over again. The patchwork of so …

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Quietly, on the way to Mars

i. There were things I was sorry to see fade: the haze of Earth’s atmosphere, the last soundwaves from home, and his fingerprints on my skin. ii. They sent him to sprinkle seeds like fairy dust, to thaw frozen soil …

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Submission to Cordite 84: SUBURBIA

SuburbiaSend us your latest and greatest poems about the suburbs, the immense variety of life therein, and whether your suburban experience is inner, outer, middle-belt, beachside, exclusive, inclusive, multicultural, bogan, hipster or something else together.

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Submission to Cordite 83: MATHEMATICS

MathematicsThe invention of transfinite set theory by the 19th Century German mathematician, Georg Cantor, hinges the romantic conception of a boundless infinite to a post-Cantorian description of an infinity of infinities.

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John Clarke’s Complete Verse

Clarke introduces a number of Australian poets hitherto unknown, whose work has a huge influence on English poetry. There is Arnold Wordsworth, ‘a plumber in Sydney during the first half of the 19th century … responsible for a good deal of the underground piping in Annandale and Balmain. He lived with his sister Gail and with his mate Ewen Coleridge, who shared his interest in plumbing, and also in poetry and, to a degree, in Gail’.

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Introduction to Tanya Thaweeskulchai’s A Salivating Monstrous Plant

The greatest thing, writes Aristotle in the Poetics, is the command of metaphor, an eye for resemblances. The first overt metaphor in Tanya Thaweeskulchai’s A Salivating Monstrous Plant appears in its second sentence: ‘These noises conglomerate, building like a nest of waking vipers’.

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Submission to Cordite 82: LAND

LandDisturbed land. Conserved land.

Whose land? Yours, mine, the landlady’s?

Landlocked.

Land unlocked.

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Submission to Cordite 85: UNPRINTABLE

UNPRINTABLEWe are looking for digital writing that is any combination of visual, variable, playful, political, procedural, conceptual, computational or performative.

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Introduction to Broede Carmody’s Flat Exit

A first book of poems needs no introduction, being its own forerunner. As a consequence, this note merely states the obvious: that Broede Carmody is a young writer with a great lyrical talent.

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Introduction to Matthew Hall’s False Fruits

Fruit is the apogee of the pastoral. It’s what the work, the waiting, the ritual and the thanks are for. But the making of fruit is costly and even the ‘natural’ cycle of things will be managed so some factors are privileged over others. In this cycle of post-lyrical poems, Hall questions the form and circumstances of these factors. What are they?

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