GUNCOTTON



Reality On-demand

1. Demo Day Jo Gaines walks right into me and takes stock. Good bones, y’all – I love this one. So much potential. Knuckle through a wall or two and fill me up with light, hem back the big trees …

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What We Know About Her

the price of freedom is eternal vigilance – Thomas Jefferson What we know about her is what she gives us freely of her own will, one click wrap privacy policy at a time, swiping across the slate of her life. …

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Winners for the Val Vallis Award for an Unpublished Poem 2018

Run by Queensland Poetry Festival, and named in honour of a distinguished Queensland poet, the Arts Queensland Val Vallis Award for an Unpublished Poem is committed to encouraging poets throughout Australia. 2018 Selection panel: Alison Whittaker and Angela Gardner.

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Submission to Cordite 89: DOMESTIC

DomesticI invite you to lean into this DOMESTIC sphere in all its homely undoing. Use words like beautiful bait to seduce hearts with razor-sharp decolonising intent and rupture the masquerading shape of cosy bliss, as only a poem can.

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Introduction to Marjon Mossammaparast’s That Sight

Photo by Gen Ackland. BUY YOUR COPY HERE Marjon Mossammaparast’s That Sight offers us a wide-ranging series of viewpoints, taking the reader through various locations and histories. It zooms out to cosmological heights, and even beyond to God (or the …

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Introduction to Elena Gomez’s Body of Work

There’s a difference between occupying a seemingly unceasing parade of subject positions through a kind of colonising, thieving, dissipatory borderlessness … and inhabiting them as a form of aesthetic and political revolt.

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Submission to Cordite 88: TRANSQUEER

TransqueerTRANSQUEER is a call for you to say something that maybe you haven’t been able to say before. It asks you to find poetry in / between lines, binaries and stultifying categorisations; from the life of flesh, from inside the bleating, many-chambered heart of gender and sexuality.

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Varatharajan on as Commissioning Editor

Cordite is chuffed (once again) to announce that, joining Rosalind McFarlane, Amelia Dale and Joan Fleming as commissioning editors, Prithvi Varatharajan is joining the Cordite Poetry Review fold as commissioning editor for media poetry.

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Submission to Cordite 87: DIFFICULT

Poetry for Cordite 87: DIFFICULT is guest-edited by Oscar Schwartz and Holly Isemonger. Says Holly: Poems can be spiky, sassy, cutting and frustrating – difficulty is built into how we perceive them. Probably as a result of schooling – a …

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Introduction to Helen Lambert’s Echoland

Helen Lambert’s work is as new to me as it will be to others – she has been operating away from Australian poetry for some time, with long periods in Ireland and, lately, Russia. One approaches a new poet warily. Yet the inventive and capable intelligence behind the poems here is immediately apparent. It is wonderful to be able to drop one’s guard, to forget it – and to enter a wonderful world.

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Introduction to Siobhan Hodge’s Justice for Romeo

Justice for Romeo, as a title, will seem both accurate and misleading for most readers; this is a book decidedly concerned with justice, and Siobhan Hodge’s sense of ethical responsibility pervades the poems. Hodge’s book includes as epigraph the exchange between Romeo and a servant in Act I, Scene ii of the most famous love story of all time; the servant asks, ‘I pray, can you read any thing you see?’, to which Romeo replies, ‘Ay, if I know the letters and the language.’

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Introduction to Lindsay Tuggle’s Calenture

Lindsay Tuggle’s poetry is uncomfortable to read: the discomforts one feels in reading her work are the very thing that make it memorable. At once immensely personal, ornate, and unapologetically embedded in female experience, it is a style unconcerned with irony or terseness. It is a verse informed by the still-alive alternative histories of the American South and haunted by the Southern Gothic literature that these histories inform.

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