GUNCOTTON



Introduction to Jeanine Leane’s Walk Back Over

In Walk Back Over, Wiradjuri woman – read: poet, academic, historian, teacher – Jeanine Leane takes off our wallpaper to reveal the personal and political layers of a nuanced history.

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Introduction to Anne Elvey’s White on White

What is happening in these poems? Or do I mean what happens to us, the readers? But which ‘us’? And what reader? I am not really talking about feeling, although who couldn’t, wouldn’t, feel when ‘School Days’ – a poem that records every detail of white skin and soul, sun-warmed government-issue school milk and British ritual in one colonial Australian home – has another child, likely an Indigenous Australian child, stolen ‘while waiting for a train’.

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Winners for the Val Vallis Award for an Unpublished Poem 2017

Run by Queensland Poetry Festival, and named in honour of a distinguished Queensland poet, the Arts Queensland Val Vallis Award for an Unpublished Poem is committed to encouraging poets throughout Australia. 2017 Selection panel: Stuart Barnes and Michell Cahill.

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Buying Satin Dresses at Yu Garden

I buy them like fruit, my body still on the bike, one foot grounded. This one like a wedge of lime on my lip. Idiot machines clench these colours together in some grainy province, craft ravelled down to whatever thread’s …

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(after) HER: dating app adventures

how do you say how you doin?? without evoking Joey from Friends? ♥ I’m only here because I want to find a girl to ask wanna Netflix and chill? ♥ I filter out the over 40 silver-haired broken embrace that …

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The Future of Music

1. Is it the sound of rain, or rain Distorted, a downpipe, the pitch Of blue harmonics in a score of blue? There, the sound, and then there’s you, Grand arbiter, the governor of loops, By whits, you pulse, you …

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His Master’s Voice

for my father Shovel i. Beneath a trademark rust – spendnought the worn calligraphy of work – still stamped on the shaft. The work ethic of his generation. Not replaced but repaired, over and over again. The patchwork of so …

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Quietly, on the way to Mars

i. There were things I was sorry to see fade: the haze of Earth’s atmosphere, the last soundwaves from home, and his fingerprints on my skin. ii. They sent him to sprinkle seeds like fairy dust, to thaw frozen soil …

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Submission to Cordite 84: SUBURBIA

SuburbiaSend us your latest and greatest poems about the suburbs, the immense variety of life therein, and whether your suburban experience is inner, outer, middle-belt, beachside, exclusive, inclusive, multicultural, bogan, hipster or something else together.

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Submission to Cordite 83: MATHEMATICS

MathematicsThe invention of transfinite set theory by the 19th Century German mathematician, Georg Cantor, hinges the romantic conception of a boundless infinite to a post-Cantorian description of an infinity of infinities.

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John Clarke’s Complete Verse

Clarke introduces a number of Australian poets hitherto unknown, whose work has a huge influence on English poetry. There is Arnold Wordsworth, ‘a plumber in Sydney during the first half of the 19th century … responsible for a good deal of the underground piping in Annandale and Balmain. He lived with his sister Gail and with his mate Ewen Coleridge, who shared his interest in plumbing, and also in poetry and, to a degree, in Gail’.

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Introduction to Tanya Thaweeskulchai’s A Salivating Monstrous Plant

The greatest thing, writes Aristotle in the Poetics, is the command of metaphor, an eye for resemblances. The first overt metaphor in Tanya Thaweeskulchai’s A Salivating Monstrous Plant appears in its second sentence: ‘These noises conglomerate, building like a nest of waking vipers’.

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