CONTRIBUTORS

Judith Beveridge

Judith Beveridge is the author of six collections of poetry, most recently Devadatta’s Poems (Giramondo Publishing) which was short-listed for the NSW and Qld Premiers’ poetry prizes and the Prime Minister’s Poetry Award. Her next book, Sun Music: New and Selected Poems, will be published in 2018 by Giramondo Publishing.

http://www.poetrylibrary.edu.au/poets/beveridge-judith

‘You’re never disembodied from the action’: Dylan Frusher Interviews Judith Beveridge

Judith Beveridge is the author of six collections of poetry and throughout her writing life she has received multiple awards, including the Queensland Premier’s Literary Award, Victorian Premier’s Literary Award, New South Wales Premier’s Literary Awards and the Kenneth Slessor Prize for Poetry.

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Driving to Broken Hill

Distance—continuous, ungestured. Crows on fence-wire-watch stretching into a haze. When a kestrel hovers it’s an abundance— like water, or a horizon with a hill. We pass towns, streets written-off by dogs and half-asleep dreamers. Those who live at the edges …

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NO THEME VI Editorial

No Theme viIt was a great privilege, if a little overwhelming (I had about 1,800 poems to read), to edit this edition of Cordite Poetry Review and, as it is not themed, I had the luxury of choosing poems on various subjects. I have tried to make the issue varied but also unified by my aesthetic principles.

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Introduction to Omar Sakr’s These Wild Houses

Omar Sakr’s These Wild Houses is a complex exploration of identity, an identity exposed in clear yet layered language, a language that takes us to the core of what he has experienced as a ‘queer Muslim Arab Australian from Western Sydney, from a broke and broken family.’

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Submission to Cordite 80: NO THEME VI

Poetry for Cordite 80: NO THEME VI is guest-edited by Judith Beveridge. Here’s what I’m looking for: poems of fewer than 100 lines, on any theme or style. So that’s about as succinct as you can get. Judith worked Cordite …

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Resort Town

Sunset here is the distant roar of motorbikes, and down Pacific Street, I hear the enormous rage that fills the mosquito’s head. Flies still circle the day’s unalterable groove. A gull pierces the distance like a sail needle. Summer’s already …

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Rory

We’d often see Rory outside the shed trying to classify the clouds coming in on the evening wind — clouds he thought were the farm’s clip of fine-grained wool. On clear blue days he’d strike match after match and try …

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Judith Beveridge’s Twelve Highlights from 2014

Throughout 2014, Judith Beveridge selected one poem per month to spotlight in Cordite Poetry Review, and she delivered excellent choices … writing a bit to each selection. We have compiled them all here in one article. Enjoy!

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Feature Poem with Judith Beveridge: At Willabah

I forget who it was who said that the writer needs to be ‘holy in small things’, but I think there is a great deal of truth in that. That’s one reason why I’m attracted by Todd Turner’s poem ‘At Willabah’. Here, the poet guides us through the details of the landscape in a not dissimilar way to the deep engagement with particulars in such poems as Seamus Heaney’s ‘Death of a Naturalist’ or Elizabeth Bishop’s ‘At the Fishhouses’.

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When the Wind Stopped

I read somewhere that the words ‘ekphrasis’ and ‘ekphrastic’ had at one stage a reference only in the Oxford dictionary, but nowadays these words are very much part of poets’ vocabularies and practices and most poets at some stage write …

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Feature Poem with Judith Beveridge: Myrrh

Pablo Neruda said this: It’s the words that sing, they soar and descend… I bow to them… I cling to them, I run them down, I bite into them, I melt them down. I love words so much… The unexpected …

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Feature Poem with Judith Beveridge: Laneway Tom

With a distant glance and nod to Alfred, Lord Noyes’s poem, ‘The Highwayman’, Paul Scully in ‘Laneway Tom’ creates a very modern tale, one that could be playing out in the lanes and backstreets of any contemporary city. The imagery …

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