liam ferney



David Gilbey Reviews Jordie Albiston and Liam Ferney

Boom and EthelJordie Albiston’s the Book of Ethel and Liam Ferney’s Boom illustrate two dramatic obverses in contemporary Australian poetry. Both are cleverly crafted; both have levels of subtlety and manifest strength; both are linguistically sinuous and inventive, taking liberties with conventional style and syntax; both use local vernaculars in contexts of global cultural pressures; both focus, often minutely, on particular individuals caught at moments of historical change and significance and, therefore, articulate and explore ‘political’ consequences and issues; both play – gloriously, ironically, iconoclastically – with language registers as a way of exposing implied ‘bigger pictures’. And yet these two collections are worlds apart in focus, style, nuance, framing and poetic affect.

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that thin mercury sound

after the fire escapes and security guards it is good to be beyond CCTV amidst the howling sirens whipped wind the thin mercury sound sculpted on sand the base jumper poised like a civilisation on a precipice of wasting military …

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AUSFTA

borne witness to the names of the 60,000 Republic dead stickyfooted at the monolith equal parts David, Goliath before windsurfing down the runway of democracy the Capitol (mistaken for the White House) triumphantly crowning the National Mall compare our bush …

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The Viceroy’s Subservients

Thou doth detesteth too much & so it begins with the ants marshalled like Ukrainian cannon fodder spread across the aprons of the Volga. & They Will Not Be Overcome! Not by powder or spray or the diligence to daily …

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Listening to Maggot Brain for the First Time

– on a Dodo broadband connection for ND Freeways are never exactly that. Changing lanes with Maria Wyeth in the rearview like a tail. The headstones marched around the bend. The pool where I learnt to swim offered up to …

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Q&A with Liam Ferney

Liam Ferney is a Brisbane poet. He works in politics. His collections of poetry include Career (Vagabond Press, 2011) and Popular Mechanics (Interactive Press, 2004). He is a former Poetry Editor of Cordite. Can you describe your typical day at …

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Knocking Shop

it’s like a Hiroshima of fun then instead of buying scones from the CWA ladies spruiking at Camp Hill State School we turn our attention to the candidates and I remember I collected how-to-votes for Hawke’s second or maybe Ahern’s …

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Glad to be Unhappy

Tell me Martin – I remember the tutorial, (on who? Hewett?) about Stalin’s midnight Mandelstam phonecall, but as the grey sky marshaled troops for another assault on the swollen creeks I did my best to forget public service selection criteria. …

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It’s Time, It’s Time (지금이야, 지금이야)

New Year clocks on over fog valley, temperate Tibetans account for contributions. Suburbs struggle and sweat through a summer scented with mumbles and deceptions. Fat detractors and software spruikers expire, the paddockbashers steam from the load. The thin mechanic massages …

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The New Scientist (새로운 과학자)

like a brave flag parading in the slipstream of some desk jockey’s eight start day the miracles of this season ruffle like a party dress or the leaves in the trees that ridge as snug as a favourite collar and …

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Children of Malley 2: Vogel’s Gang

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Francois Sagat O’Malley: Glad Pews and the Good Steeple

you don’t always want what you say, or say what you do (do you): Notes of a Warring Class, J.H. Prynne   Lodge the pre-budget ambit claim. Graphs observe their models. The steam rises. The sport of the day’s nadir. …

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