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Keiji Minato: Notes on Modern Haiku (1)

Haiku is a literary form. It carries ideological elements from its history as other literary forms do. Some of these elements are deeply ingrained in the genre. For example, seasonal themes and objective descriptions are the two main principles many people in Japan and in other countries believe to be imperatives. While they surely have some relevance (as they help beginners find concrete images and avoid various pitfalls), they are not absolutely necessary conditions for haiku.

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Michael Dransfield’s Innocent Eyes

When you think of ways to interrogate innocence, you will sooner or later come to a moral dichotomy. It can be unpackaged as either good or bad. It can oppose guilt, and by implication your innocence allows that you have …

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Genevieve Tucker: Online? Present & Accounted For

In 2003 Cordite commissioned Anna Hedigan to review the websites of Australia's established literary journals. Now, four years later, we ask: what's changed? Genevieve Tucker's update looks at the online presences of some of Australia's litjournals in the context of …

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David Prater: Hits & Online Readership

Frank Moorhouse's article in The Sunday Age (full text here) discusses the ongoing Meanjin 'controversy' in a much-needed context: that of the troubles currently facing print magazines, as well as some of the problems facing online magazines in Australia.

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Leanne Hills: Moving Galleries on Melbourne’s trains

It's a commonly raised question within this community: how to bring poetry back into the public mind? Are we content as readers and writers of poetry to remain marginalised while sport maintains its deified position in this country? Moving Galleries, an initiative recently launched on Melbourne's trains, is an attempt to redress this imbalance.

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Rachel Blau DuPlessis and Abstract Morality In Post-Avant Poetry

“Post-avant” poetry is widely considered to be an important branch of the post-modern tree. Yet, a distinction exists between post-avant & “po-mo” in other genres & art-forms.

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Wandering in Wuhan

I am astounded to find that ancient and medieval poetry occupies a uniquely central presence in Wuhan's contemporary identity; that, in spite of ideological and legal issues and restrictions, new cutting-edge poetry grows across China's cyberspace; and that all of this is happening in spite of a rapid, and some might say rabid, modernisation and commercialisation.

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Patrick Jones responds to James Stuart

When a poet works with a designer, publisher, artist, typesetter, printmaker, stone mason (in Finlay's case), earthmover, or sign writer there is the potential for the poem to materialise (a shift from transformation), and keep us on our feet.

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James Stuart: From Text To Texture

James Stuart reviews Words and Things (Patrick Jones, ed.) in our Submerged issue. The review is part of a larger article commissioned by Cordite, available here in PDF format.

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Will Day: Richard Frankland’s Charcoal Club / My Deconstruction Fatigue

What came home to me during the Charcoal Club was that regardless of my tribe's on-going conscious or unconscious genocide, the generous indigenous spirit was coming to get me whether I liked it or not, was infiltrating me bit by bit because, like the indigenous Australians I too had been up-rooted, bleached and taken for a fool.

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Postcard from Cardiff

I sought it here, I sought it there, I sought it everywhere. It is a sad, but true fact. There are no visible Internet cafes in Cardiff. So when I finally discovered a few terminals at Maccas in the Queen Street mall area, it was a dubious turn of events.

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Liam Ferney: Billy Bragg and the fight for a new Australia

Thatcherism was the name given to the tide of economic rationalism that swept through Britain in the 1980's. It was a series of, often forceful, policy reforms and social upheavals that transformed the nation economically, politically, socially and philosophically. Musically, the nation was mute. The original f&^k you of punk's first wave, which was quite often only ever protest for protests sake, had all but died. In its place the superficiality of New Wave and the introspection of Goth reigned supreme.

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