renga



"Zombies In the Fields"

This renga is a compilation of Zombie Haikunaut Renga I and Zombie Haikunaut Renga II. Read an explanation of the original instructions. And very big thanks to Ashley Capes, our renga master!

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Zombie Haikunaut Renga II

This is Part 2 of Cordite’s Zombie Haikunaut Renga project, continued from Zombie Haikunaut Renga I. Please read the instructions if in doubt about commenting on this post!

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Zombie Haikunaut Renga I

This is Part 1 of Cordite's Zombie Haikunaut Renga project.

Please read the instructions before commenting on this post!

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"Haikunaut Island Renga"

flub-a-dub in the purple west helicopter (David G. Lanoue) a bald eagle atop the sharp left turn sign (Naia) a woman knits flowers on a soldier's grave (Lawrence) her second husband wears red-framed glasses (SAT??Æ Ayaka) apple sack and a …

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Haikunaut Island Renga 2

children laugh unafraid of the past in the summer grass (Keiji Minato) a ladybug of leisure wanders upside-down (Fleur) on a city tram opening to Han Shan's distances (Lorin Ford) cold mountain range plays hidden music (Joseph Mueller) hunting truffles …

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Haikunaut Island Renga 1

flub-a-dub in the purple west helicopter (David G. Lanoue) a bald eagle atop the sharp left turn sign (Naia) a woman knits flowers on a soldier's grave (Lawrence) her second husband wears red-framed glasses (SAT??Æ Ayaka) apple sack and a …

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Notes on Renga

Image by Keiji MinatoRenga is a collaborative form of poetry from Japan. In Japan it is now called “renku,” but the term “renga” has been internationally used for quite a long time, so let's go with “renga” here. Renga was born from the tradition of waka, the traditional/prestigious poetic form with 5-7-5-7-7 morae (sound units), in the 12th century. In the beginning it rigidly followed the high aesthetic of old waka in the Royal Court. However, later it began to incorporate secular elements and gave birth to a genre called haikai-no-renga (roughly meaning “mock-renga”) or haikai. Since the end of the 19th century it has been commonly called “renku.” Well, it has quite a tradition …

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David Prater experiences Roo-ku (LIVE)

LIVE: Roo-ku (Overload Poetry Festival) Saturday 23 August 2003 I was flattered to receive an invitation last month to MC a reading put on by the Overload Poetry Festival with the mischievous title of “Roo-ku” – as in Australian haiku, …

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